Lit List: Wednesday September 28, 2016

 Virginia Woolf (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Virginia Woolf (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Good evening readers. Here's our round-up of today's must-read literary news, commentary and fiction.

  • On the Heterodox Jewishness of Clarice Lispector: Judaism isn't front and center in the work of "the greatest Jewish writer since Kafka," but her use of mysticism and language hints at her roots. (Lithub)
  • Vijay Seshadri: A dialogue with the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet the observation and empathy that go into writing poetry and whether they can be taught. Dive Dapper)
  • Sara Coleridge Was Always In Motion: Virginia Woolf paints a moving portrait of the introspective daughter of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. (Berfrois)
  • Tana French's Intimate Crime Fiction: Mystery novels all plumb society's fears, but one Irish mystery writer refuses to resolve them with a tidy conclusion. (The New Yorker)
  • Leiomy Maldonado on the culture of vogue: The hair-whipping icon reminisces about the vogue balls of the 70s and 80s and their importance as a safe haven and creative outlet in a time of repression and danger. (The Creative Independent)
  • Forget Orhan Pamuk. Burhan Sonmez has written the real Istanbul novel: An excerpt from the novel Istanbul Istanbul recounts the stories of four Turkish prisoners. (Scroll.in)
  • Here's How Book Covers Look in the UK vs. the US: A side-by-side comparison of book designs hints at different cultural tendencies in marketing. (Buzzfeed Books)
  • Listening In: Javier Marías's Thus Bad Begins explores the growing pains of Spanish society in the 80s after the death of Franco, when freedom seemed overwhelming. (Bookforum)
  • New Agatha Christie Themed Stamps: Stylish commemorative stamps will be issued throughout the UK to honor the "grande dame of crime." (Electric Lit)