Lit List: Monday September 19, 2016

 Ayu Utami (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Ayu Utami (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Good evening readers. Here's a round-up of today's must-read literary news, commentary and fiction. 

  • Life That Could Fit in a Spreadsheet: an interview with Eduardo Rabasa, the author of the satirical novel Zero-Sum Game. (The New Inquiry)
  • A Decade Lived in the Dark: A woman wrote a best-selling memoir about her mysterious and incurable photosensitivity, but her story seems suspicious. (The New Yorker)
  • First Woman Sworn In As Librarian of Congress: Carla Hayden, the first woman and the first African-American to hold the office, talks about the continued importance of libraries when so much information is now available online. (NPR)
  • Paranoid Android: Philip K. Dick's neurotic fiction mirrored his chronic paranoia and beliefs that neither the world nor his own body were what they seemed. (Literary Review)
  • There Is No Map: The New Italians: Today, migrations broaden definitions of national identity, but Italian literature has always been a melting pot. (Words Without Borders)
  • In Carl Hiaasen’s New Novel, Crazy Things Keep Happening: Is there something in the water in South Florida? (The New York Times)
  • The Confessions of A: Reminiscences of a childhood in Suharto's Indonesia, in a family that believed in ghosts. (Asymptote)
  • Yoss: An interview with a pioneer of Cuban science fiction. (BOMB Magazine)
  • Loner: an excerpt from a novel set at Harvard whose protagonist "was into success, just like everyone else who’d gotten in here, but admitting that was taboo." (Lithub)