Lit List: Wednesday October 5, 2016

 Junot Díaz (Source: The MacArthur Foundation)

Junot Díaz (Source: The MacArthur Foundation)

Good evening readers. Here's your round-up of today's must-read literary news, commentary and fiction.

  • 29th Hispanic Heritage Awards | Junot Díaz | Full Speech: The author gave a moving speech about the heroism of immigration and survival. PBS
  • More savage than Caravaggio: The woman who took revenge in oil: The tormented, creative life of Artemisia Gentileschi. The Guardian
  • Review: Nell Zink’s ‘Nicotine’ Is Hard to Put Down, Despite Its Unruly Plot: A tale of "friendly anarchist squatters" who have deadpan wit, political conviction, and not much else. The New York Times
  • Karl Marx, Yesterday and Today: "You can put Marx back into the nineteenth century, but you can’t keep him there." The New Yorker
  • Talk About the Weather: The quintessential British conversational topic has also been great fodder for art and literature. Public Books
  • A Visit to Charlotte Street: After decades of "benign neglect" of the Bronx, who will benefit from its urban renewal? Catapult
  • "The Angel of History" says "I Will Not Forget": Rabih Alameddine's novel about remembrance of the AIDS epidemic features in-person appearances by Death and Satan. NPR
  • Revisited: Behold the Z-19: An ode to a piece of technology so outdated it can't be called a computer, but a word processing interface. The Paris Review
  • Gloria Naylor, whose novels gave voice to African American women, dies at 66: Naylor won a National Book Award for The Women of Brewster Place, a novel chronicling the friendships and romances of women in a housing project. The Washington Post
  • Living the Life: A new book delves into one partcular player of the capricious world of Hollywood: the "agent-as-conductor-of-cosmic-chaos." The London Review of Books